BASIC TURKEY BRINE RECIPE RECIPES

facebook share image    twitter share image    pinterest share image    E-Mail share image

BASIC ALL PURPOSE BRINE FOR MEATS, CHICKEN, AND TURKEY R…



Basic All Purpose Brine for Meats, Chicken, and Turkey R… image

Make and share this Basic All Purpose Brine for Meats, Chicken, and Turkey recipe from Food.com.

Total Time 3 hours 15 minutes

Prep Time 15 minutes

Cook Time 3 hours

Yield 1 quart

Number Of Ingredients 7

1 tablespoon black peppercorns
2 sprigs fresh thyme
3 bay leaves
4 -6 cloves garlic, sliced
4 cups water
1/2 cup light brown sugar, packed
1/2 cup kosher salt

Steps:

  • Makes 1 quart- make up additional amounts of brine if needed until meat is submerged.
  • Stir ingredients together in a saucepan and bring to a boil.
  • Continue stirring until sugar is dissolved.
  • Allow to cool.
  • Place meat or poultry in a food safe plastic bag inside another container for support and leakage control (oven roasting bags are a fine choice- NOT garbage bags).
  • Pour cooled brine into bag, and squeeze out as much air as possible and seal with a twistie tie.
  • Refrigerate for 3-4 hours for 3 pounds meat (such as pork ribs), 5-6 hours for a nice roasting hen, or 12-24 hours for a turkey, 12 hours being for a small one and the longer time for those turkeys around 20+ pounds.
  • Discard brine before using and pat meat dry.
  • If using poultry, you may want to add citrus fruit such as oranges or lemons, additional fresh herbs, or cloves of garlic into the cavity.
  • Prepare meat as desired- roast, bbq, etc.

Nutrition Facts : Calories 458.3, FatContent 0.4, SaturatedFatContent 0.1, CholesterolContent 0, SodiumContent 56649.7, CarbohydrateContent 117.6, FiberContent 2.5, SugarContent 106.9, ProteinContent 1.8

HOW TO MAKE A BASIC BRINE | TECHNIQUE | NO RECIPE REQUIRED



How to Make a Basic Brine | Technique | No Recipe Required image

Provided by Dave Beaulieu

Total Time 25 minutes

Prep Time 25 minutes

Steps:

  • Brining is a process similar to marinating in that both expose food to a flavored liquid, but they actually work in significantly different ways.  Marinating is usually a relatively short process (3 – 5 hours) that primarily uses acid to break down meat fibers, resulting in greater tenderness. The flavors involved are often strong and leave a big impact on the food.  Brining on the other hand, uses osmosis (via a combination of salt and water), to develop flavor and moisture. How does brining work? Salt draws moisture out of food; which doesn’t sounds like a good thing.  As an experiment, take two slices of eggplant, and liberally salt one but not the other.  Let them sit on separate plates for 10 minutes.  When you come back, you’ll find that the salted slice has exuded a significant amount of water to the surface, while the other still looks relatively dry.  That water is drawn out by the salt.  So you may ask, if salt pulls water out of food, wouldn’t brining a piece of meat pull all of the moisture out of it?  Well, the answer is it does, but that ok because of….Osmosis. Osmosis, is a process where water moves and out of cells.  And because salt draws water, we can use it to actually move water in and out of food.  Without getting into the gory details, the salt in a brine, given enough time, will carry moisture (and potentially flavor) into whatever is being brined.  Most brines also contain sugar, to balance out the salt, and bring some additional flavor the party.  You can also add many other flavors, like peppercorn, or other spices, herbs, or other flavoring liquids.   Unlike marinades, you need to brine for a long time (I never do less than 8 hours).  Short periods will draw moisture out of food, without giving time for it to be pulled back in. Applications – what should I brine? I generally use brines for low fat cuts of meat.  Brines are great for chicken, pork, and turkeys.  In fact, I don’t think I’ve cooked an unbrined pork chop in years.  Depending on the meat, and what your mood is, you can vary up the brine’s flavors but they should always have salt, sugar and water. Some Brine Recipes: Chicken or Turkey Brine Pork Brine Flavored Brines How to make a brine The basic brine consists of three elements – salt, sugar, and water (technically just water and salt, but I never make one without sugar).  I use about ½ cup of both sugar and salt to one quart of water.  To ensure that the salt and sugar dissolve in the water, I’ll mix the salt/sugar in boiling water, using ½ the amount of total water, and then cool the mixture by added the other ½ quart’s worth of water in ice cubes. While water is water, and salt, salt (actually there’s many different types of salt, but for a brine I’d just use regular kosher salt), you can definitely have some fun with the sugar.  White table sugar is just fine to use, but brown sugar carries a different flavor, as does honey, molasses, and maple syrup.  By swapping any of these with white sugar you can modify the flavor of the finished product.  You can also add other flavor components to the dish – peppercorns at a minimum, but any other spices or herbs you’d like, or aromatic vegetables like onion, carrot and celery.  With each, the flavor will get carried into the meat as it brines. Preparation & Cooking I like to take the meat out of the brine for 15 – 20 minutes before I’m ready to cook it, so that it comes back up to room temperature (always keep your brining foods in the fridge) and to release some of the excess moisture.  Then I season them as normal. One thing to note, is that the meat’s taken on a lot more sugar than its natural state, and sugar burns more quickly than protein.  So be a bit more diligent than normal and check the sear a little sooner than you might otherwise to prevent burning.

More about "basic turkey brine recipe recipes"

HOW TO MAKE A BASIC BRINE | TECHNIQUE | NO RECIPE REQUIRED
From noreciperequired.com
Reviews 2.5
Total Time 25 minutes
  • Brining is a process similar to marinating in that both expose food to a flavored liquid, but they actually work in significantly different ways.  Marinating is usually a relatively short process (3 – 5 hours) that primarily uses acid to break down meat fibers, resulting in greater tenderness. The flavors involved are often strong and leave a big impact on the food.  Brining on the other hand, uses osmosis (via a combination of salt and water), to develop flavor and moisture. How does brining work? Salt draws moisture out of food; which doesn’t sounds like a good thing.  As an experiment, take two slices of eggplant, and liberally salt one but not the other.  Let them sit on separate plates for 10 minutes.  When you come back, you’ll find that the salted slice has exuded a significant amount of water to the surface, while the other still looks relatively dry.  That water is drawn out by the salt.  So you may ask, if salt pulls water out of food, wouldn’t brining a piece of meat pull all of the moisture out of it?  Well, the answer is it does, but that ok because of….Osmosis. Osmosis, is a process where water moves and out of cells.  And because salt draws water, we can use it to actually move water in and out of food.  Without getting into the gory details, the salt in a brine, given enough time, will carry moisture (and potentially flavor) into whatever is being brined.  Most brines also contain sugar, to balance out the salt, and bring some additional flavor the party.  You can also add many other flavors, like peppercorn, or other spices, herbs, or other flavoring liquids.   Unlike marinades, you need to brine for a long time (I never do less than 8 hours).  Short periods will draw moisture out of food, without giving time for it to be pulled back in. Applications – what should I brine? I generally use brines for low fat cuts of meat.  Brines are great for chicken, pork, and turkeys.  In fact, I don’t think I’ve cooked an unbrined pork chop in years.  Depending on the meat, and what your mood is, you can vary up the brine’s flavors but they should always have salt, sugar and water. Some Brine Recipes: Chicken or Turkey Brine Pork Brine Flavored Brines How to make a brine The basic brine consists of three elements – salt, sugar, and water (technically just water and salt, but I never make one without sugar).  I use about ½ cup of both sugar and salt to one quart of water.  To ensure that the salt and sugar dissolve in the water, I’ll mix the salt/sugar in boiling water, using ½ the amount of total water, and then cool the mixture by added the other ½ quart’s worth of water in ice cubes. While water is water, and salt, salt (actually there’s many different types of salt, but for a brine I’d just use regular kosher salt), you can definitely have some fun with the sugar.  White table sugar is just fine to use, but brown sugar carries a different flavor, as does honey, molasses, and maple syrup.  By swapping any of these with white sugar you can modify the flavor of the finished product.  You can also add other flavor components to the dish – peppercorns at a minimum, but any other spices or herbs you’d like, or aromatic vegetables like onion, carrot and celery.  With each, the flavor will get carried into the meat as it brines. Preparation & Cooking I like to take the meat out of the brine for 15 – 20 minutes before I’m ready to cook it, so that it comes back up to room temperature (always keep your brining foods in the fridge) and to release some of the excess moisture.  Then I season them as normal. One thing to note, is that the meat’s taken on a lot more sugar than its natural state, and sugar burns more quickly than protein.  So be a bit more diligent than normal and check the sear a little sooner than you might otherwise to prevent burning.
See details


TURKEY BRINE RECIPE | ALLRECIPES
Use this turkey brine recipe to produce an easy, flavorful main dish this Thanksgiving. ... a brine is a basic solution of water and salt. Many brine recipes, though, contain extra spices and seasonings to amp up the flavor. ... After checking out several "brine" recipes, I didn't read of anyone actually stuffing the turkey …
From allrecipes.com
See details


TURKEY BRINE RECIPES | ALLRECIPES
This is a very basic brine recipe for preparing meats and fish for smoking. Add any personal taste preferences to the brine for additional flavor enhancement. I like to add white wine, …
From allrecipes.com
See details


HOW TO BRINE A CHICKEN – BASIC CHICKEN BRINE RECIPE
Remove chicken from brine and rinse chicken well. You are now ready to make a tender juicy chicken dish of your choosing. Tips for Basic Chicken Brine . You can do this with turkey, as well. If doing a whole turkey, put your turkey in an insulated cooler with enough water to cover and add in a 5 pound bag of ice. Brine …
From recipe-diaries.com
See details


BASIC BRINE RECIPE - FOOD SCIENCE | EXPLORATORIUM
Place the meat in the brine and put the whole container in the refrigerator. If it doesn’t fit, place it in an ice chest filled with ice. The length of time the brine takes to enter the meat depends on …
From exploratorium.edu
See details


THE BEST TURKEY RUB RECIPES - THE SPRUCE EATS
Sep 26, 2020 · Country Fried Turkey Recipe 2 hrs Ratings. 21 Thanksgiving Turkey Recipes For Your Holiday Menu Basic Pork Rub 10 mins Ratings. Savory Turkey Brine 30 mins Ratings. Spit-Roasted Turkey 3 hrs Ratings. Apple Spice Turkey Brine 30 mins Ratings. Top Poultry Rub Recipes Cajun Turkey Seasoning Rub 15 mins Ratings. Smoked Turkey Brine …
From thespruceeats.com
See details


HOW TO BRINE CHICKEN WINGS | 6 EASY TIPS & RECIPE
Feb 22, 2022 · You can brine skinless chicken wings for just a few hours, but to get the real full effects I’d go much longer. I recommend brining chicken overnight (8 hours) at a minimum, however I’d also suggest trying going a full 24 hours to get the absolute most out of the brine.
From theonlinegrill.com
See details


CLASSIC PORK CHOPS AND TENDERLOIN SALT BRINE RECIPE
Apr 22, 2021 · The brine does not kill bacteria that may be on the raw meat, so clean thoroughly. If you wish to further season the pork before cooking, opt for a salt-free seasoning or spices. Coat the tenderloin with the salt-free seasoning rub of your choice, and cook as directed per the grilling or oven roasting instructions of your preferred recipe.
From thespruceeats.com
See details


PORK CHOP BRINE {EASY!} - SPEND WITH PENNIES
Jul 20, 2020 · Tips for Success. As with turkey brine, ensure the sugar and salt are fully dissolved in the water. No need to bring the water to a boil, just a gentle simmer will do! To ensure that chops …
From spendwithpennies.com
See details


THE BEST TURKEY RUB RECIPES - THE SPRUCE EATS
Sep 26, 2020 · Seasoning rubs add deep flavors and a savory taste to any type of meat, and turkey definitely benefits from this type of flavoring treatment. A good rub adds layers of flavor, as well as beautiful color to the skin. From fresh herbs to Cajun spice, any of these six rubs will turn your turkey …
From thespruceeats.com
See details


HOW TO BRINE CHICKEN WINGS | 6 EASY TIPS & RECIPE
Feb 22, 2022 · You can brine skinless chicken wings for just a few hours, but to get the real full effects I’d go much longer. I recommend brining chicken overnight (8 hours) at a minimum, however I’d also suggest trying going a full 24 hours to get the absolute most out of the brine.
From theonlinegrill.com
See details


CLASSIC PORK CHOPS AND TENDERLOIN SALT BRINE RECIPE
Apr 22, 2021 · The brine does not kill bacteria that may be on the raw meat, so clean thoroughly. If you wish to further season the pork before cooking, opt for a salt-free seasoning or spices. Coat the tenderloin with the salt-free seasoning rub of your choice, and cook as directed per the grilling or oven roasting instructions of your preferred recipe.
From thespruceeats.com
See details


PORK CHOP BRINE {EASY!} - SPEND WITH PENNIES
Jul 20, 2020 · Tips for Success. As with turkey brine, ensure the sugar and salt are fully dissolved in the water. No need to bring the water to a boil, just a gentle simmer will do! To ensure that chops …
From spendwithpennies.com
See details


HOW TO BRINE - COOKTHESTORY
See my recipe below for a basic brine solution. It’ll make enough for 4 pork chops, 4 chicken breasts or 2 pork tenderloins. ... 1-inch thick pork chops or pork tenderloins, 8-12 hours for a whole chicken or turkey breast, 12-24 hours for a whole turkey or pork loin. Remove the meat from the brine, pat it dry, and proceed with your recipe …
From cookthestory.com
See details


TOP 50 THANKSGIVING DINNER RECIPES - FOOD NETWORK
Nov 16, 2021 · With more than 5,000 reviews and a 5-star rating, Alton Brown's classic turkey is the go-to foolproof recipe every cook can use. Get the Recipe: Good Eats Roast Turkey …
From foodnetwork.com
See details


CLASSIC PORK CHOPS AND TENDERLOIN SALT BRINE RECIPE
Apr 22, 2021 · The brine does not kill bacteria that may be on the raw meat, so clean thoroughly. If you wish to further season the pork before cooking, opt for a salt-free seasoning or spices. Coat the tenderloin with the salt-free seasoning rub of your choice, and cook as directed per the grilling or oven roasting instructions of your preferred recipe.
From thespruceeats.com
See details


PORK CHOP BRINE {EASY!} - SPEND WITH PENNIES
Jul 20, 2020 · Tips for Success. As with turkey brine, ensure the sugar and salt are fully dissolved in the water. No need to bring the water to a boil, just a gentle simmer will do! To ensure that chops …
From spendwithpennies.com
See details


HOW TO BRINE - COOKTHESTORY
See my recipe below for a basic brine solution. It’ll make enough for 4 pork chops, 4 chicken breasts or 2 pork tenderloins. ... 1-inch thick pork chops or pork tenderloins, 8-12 hours for a whole chicken or turkey breast, 12-24 hours for a whole turkey or pork loin. Remove the meat from the brine, pat it dry, and proceed with your recipe …
From cookthestory.com
See details


TOP 50 THANKSGIVING DINNER RECIPES - FOOD NETWORK
Nov 16, 2021 · With more than 5,000 reviews and a 5-star rating, Alton Brown's classic turkey is the go-to foolproof recipe every cook can use. Get the Recipe: Good Eats Roast Turkey …
From foodnetwork.com
See details


¿Estás a dieta o simplemente quieres controlar los nutrientes e ingredientes de tu comida? Le ayudaremos a encontrar recetas por método de cocción, nutrición, ingredientes...
Compruébalo »

Último blog